Bibliotherapy: how reading and writing have been healing trauma since World War I

The idea of the healing book has a long history. Key concepts were forged in the crucible of World War I, as nurses, doctors and volunteer librarians grappled with treating soldiers’ minds as well as bodies. The word “bibliotherapy” itself was coined in 1914, by American author and minister Samuel McChord Crothers. Helen Mary Gaskell (1853-1940), a pioneer of “literary caregiving”, wrote about the beginnings of her war library in 1918

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As local networks retreat, Netflix is filling the gap in teen TV

By Anna Potter, University of the Sunshine Coast With storylines that encompass stalking, eating disorders, rape and suicide, Netflix dramas To the Bone and 13 Reasons Why have been accused of being harmful to their target audience: teenagers. Mental health advocates, psychologists and journalists have claimed these shows are irresponsible and unrealistic, and pose unacceptable…

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