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Category: Family | Life

Families are the basic unit of society. It’s the first institution every person experiences in some way, shape or form, for good or for ill. Life is the other reality we all live with. How can we help each other on our journey through life? What can we learn about how families and children thrive? How easily do we love one another?

How social media is helping Big Tobacco hook a new generation of smokers

Our research has not only helped shine a light on Big Tobacco’s unchecked use of social media, it has also informed a recent petition to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission requesting it to investigate and enforce these novel forms of cigarette advertising. Although it might be difficult for governments to keep on top of media in these rapidly changing times, they must do so if they hope to prevent global smoking rates and their consequent health problems from rising once again.

Alone together: how mobile devices have changed family time

There is increasing evidence that the mere presence of a phone negatively affects face-to-face interactions. This may go some way then to explain parents’ perceptions of decreasing family cohesion and time together with their children, reported in earlier studies. But what is clear, is that although a rise in “alone together” time means families now spend more time at home, it is not necessarily in a way that feels like quality time.

The psychology of fear and hate, and what each of us can do to stop it

First, how families talk about minorities and immigrants is critical. In work that we conducted in Finland, we found prejudicial opinions of Finns toward Russian immigrants are largely shaped during adolescence. It’s incumbent upon parents to be role models for their children and adolescents and to promote tolerance and mutual respect early.

Sexual and domestic violence: the hidden reasons why Mexican women flee their homes

We don’t know how many of them are women, because neither the US nor the UNHCR keeps track of gender by nationality in their asylum statistics, meaning that the violence many women are fleeing is rendered invisible.

But by cross-referencing displacement figures, qualitative information and case litigation databases, we do know one thing: patterns of persecution are different for men and women.

‘Silent victims’: royal commission recommends better protections for child victims of family violence

Children’s experiences of violence have been overlooked for too long. If we seek to change the narrative that devalues women then we must also tackle the cultures of silence and secrecy that allow for the domination of children.

The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse has indicated that cultures of secrecy function to minimise or conceal violence against children. The family violence royal commission has now found that the violence endured by children in the home has been dealt with only marginally.

In memory of Poland’s sorrow, April 2010

At first, I struggled with how I would share his life in this writing. Plus, I thought, what did it really have to do with what happened at Katyn in 1939 and 1940? Let alone last week’s tragedy.And then, unexpectedly, the information came. I uncovered details and connections of those who died, among them soldiers,whom my friend would have felt a very unique sense of gratitude for. Because among Poland’s dead last week are those who guarded and supported the sacred and tragic memories that people like my Polish friend, and his family went through, during World War II.