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Category: Medicine

Artificial intelligence in Australia needs to get ethical, so we have a plan

The question of whether technology is good or bad depends on how it’s developed and used. Nowhere is that more topical than in technolgies using artificial intelligence.

When developed and used appropriately, artificial intelligence (AI) has the potential to transform the way we live, work, communicate and travel.

TB doesn’t only attack the lungs — other organs are also vulnerable

A key risk factor for developing extrapulmonary TB is a compromised immune system which is why it is more common in patients infected with HIV. It can also occur in people with diabetes, cancer, low body weight and chronic kidney disease. Smoking and the use of drugs that can suppress the immune system also increase the risk of extrapulmonary TB.

The Catalyst for Unsung Science

In 2016 Google Doddle paid homage to Mary Seacole.  Until then, I had no idea who she was, or her contribution to history. But I quickly found it. Born in 1805 in Kingston, Jamaica, Seacole was a brave pioneering nurse during the Crimean War who helped care for wounded soldiers on the battlefield. She was known to have personally risked her life on the frontline to tend to the sick and the injured. Her reputation in her day rivaled that of Florence Nightingale.  Mary Seacole’s life story inspired me to start a short-lived blog called Unsung Science. I wrote about little known stories and personalities whose contribution to science and medicine had been overlooked. In each case, their achievements had…

Tuesday 22 February 2011: Christchurch earthquake

The magnitude of the work ahead hits. Evacuation routes for critical patients when there’s a no fly zone imposed on the South Island and the roads and infrastructure is so badly damaged or destroyed…The people in the room respond with a dedication and commitment that makes me proud and humbled to be part of New Zealand’s emergency response.

Reflections from a Nobel winner: Scientists need time to make discoveries.

It is understandable that people want to know how it affects them. But as a scientist, I would hope society would be equally interested in fundamental science. After all, you can’t have the applications without the curiosity-driven research behind it. Learning more about science — science for science’s sake — is worth supporting.